020 8202 2277 Menu

Dementia Care

What is Dementia?

Dementia is often associated with the decline of a person’s brain function and mental abilities. Commonly, dementia can be confused with Alzheimer’s disease.

Someone with dementia may begin to experience: difficulties performing daily tasks, making decisions, controlling their emotions or disinterest in their usual hobbies. It’s also common for someone with dementia to find social situations intimidating, declining public outings or the opportunities to meet with friends.

Due to this debilitating syndrome, a person suffering with Dementia will require optimum help and support from family and friends. Often, this may involve making decisions on behalf of a loved one, especially as dementia starts to progress.

What are the Symptoms of Dementia?

There are several signs and symptoms of Dementia, these include:

  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Losing the ability to carry out daily tasks
  • Struggling to follow or become involved in conversation
  • Mood swings
  • Confusion about what time it is or where they are
  • Decision making becomes difficult
  • Unable to make judgements
  • Planning and organisation can become difficult

Inevitably, these symptoms will worsen over time. The more mild form of this syndrome is often referred to as “mild cognitive impairment” (MCI). This is because the symptoms haven’t yet progressed enough to be diagnosed as dementia. These symptoms can be so subtle that they may not be picked up initially. Although the people the person will be able to notice a difference in their behaviour.

Dementia is not definitively a normal part of ageing by any means. If you or someone you know begins to display these behaviours or symptoms, visit your GP as soon as possible.

What are the Different Types of Dementia?

Dementia comes in many forms, with some being more severe than others. The different types of Dementia include:

Vascular Dementia

The second most common type of dementia, it affects approximately 150,000 people in the UK alone. The symptoms begin to occur when the brain becomes starved of blood supply, thus damaging it. There are different types of vascular dementia, these are:

  • Stroke-related dementia
  • Post-stroke dementia
  • Single-infarct and multi-infarct dementia
  • Subcortical dementia
  • Mixed dementia (vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease)

Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB)

DLB accounts for 10-15% of all British dementia cases and is often mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease. Lewy bodies can also cause Parkinson’s disease, which, much like dementia, affects the brain and nervous system.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)

Often referred to as Pick’s disease or frontal lobe dementia, Frontotemporal refers to damaged lobes of the brain, caused by the onset of dementia. Frontal lobes control our behaviour, problem-solving abilities, planning, organisation and control of emotions are found behind the forehead.

The left side of the frontal lobe controls speech. FTD occurs when nerve cells in the frontal and/or temporal lobes of the brain die. This causes the pathways that connect the two lobes to change. FTD is a less common form of dementia, and so not many people will have heard of it.

Young-onset dementia

Young-onset dementia can be diagnosed in people under the age of 65. Although the onset of dementia isn’t determined by a person’s age, younger people may have different needs and will need supporting in a different way in comparison to someone who is over the age of 65 and has been diagnosed with dementia.

To learn more about the different types of dementia, visit the Alzheimer’s Society website.

Dementia care at Care WorldWide

Caring for someone with dementia is a full time responsibility and patients often need customised care as the different types of dementia have different symptoms. A specialist dementia care home can remove the stress of caring from you, allowing you to spend quality time with your loved one whilst being in the knowledge that they are receiving quality dementia care services.

We have homes located across the United Kingdom, so you’ll be sure to find a home in your area and suitable for your needs. Get in touch with a member of our friendly team today and we’ll answer any queries you may have and help you decide which Care WorldWide dementia care home will be best for yourself or a loved one.

What is Dementia?

Dementia is often associated with the decline of a person’s brain function and mental abilities. Commonly, dementia can be confused with Alzheimer’s disease.

Someone with dementia may begin to experience: difficulties performing daily tasks, making decisions, controlling their emotions or disinterest in their usual hobbies. It’s also common for someone with dementia to find social situations intimidating, declining public outings or the opportunities to meet with friends.

Due to this debilitating syndrome, a person suffering with Dementia will require optimum help and support from family and friends. Often, this may involve making decisions on behalf of a loved one, especially as dementia starts to progress.

What are the Symptoms of Dementia?

There are several signs and symptoms of Dementia, these include:

  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Losing the ability to carry out daily tasks
  • Struggling to follow or become involved in conversation
  • Mood swings
  • Confusion about what time it is or where they are
  • Decision making becomes difficult
  • Unable to make judgements
  • Planning and organisation can become difficult

Inevitably, these symptoms will worsen over time. The more mild form of this syndrome is often referred to as “mild cognitive impairment” (MCI). This is because the symptoms haven’t yet progressed enough to be diagnosed as dementia. These symptoms can be so subtle that they may not be picked up initially. Although the people the person will be able to notice a difference in their behaviour.

Dementia is not definitively a normal part of ageing by any means. If you or someone you know begins to display these behaviours or symptoms, visit your GP as soon as possible.

What are the Different Types of Dementia?

Dementia comes in many forms, with some being more severe than others. The different types of Dementia include:

Vascular Dementia

The second most common type of dementia, it affects approximately 150,000 people in the UK alone. The symptoms begin to occur when the brain becomes starved of blood supply, thus damaging it. There are different types of vascular dementia, these are:

  • Stroke-related dementia
  • Post-stroke dementia
  • Single-infarct and multi-infarct dementia
  • Subcortical dementia
  • Mixed dementia (vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease)

Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB)

DLB accounts for 10-15% of all British dementia cases and is often mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease. Lewy bodies can also cause Parkinson’s disease, which, much like dementia, affects the brain and nervous system.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)

Often referred to as Pick’s disease or frontal lobe dementia, Frontotemporal refers to damaged lobes of the brain, caused by the onset of dementia. Frontal lobes control our behaviour, problem-solving abilities, planning, organisation and control of emotions are found behind the forehead.

The left side of the frontal lobe controls speech. FTD occurs when nerve cells in the frontal and/or temporal lobes of the brain die. This causes the pathways that connect the two lobes to change. FTD is a less common form of dementia, and so not many people will have heard of it.

Young-onset dementia

Young-onset dementia can be diagnosed in people under the age of 65. Although the onset of dementia isn’t determined by a person’s age, younger people may have different needs and will need supporting in a different way in comparison to someone who is over the age of 65 and has been diagnosed with dementia.

To learn more about the different types of dementia, visit the Alzheimer’s Society website.

Dementia care at Care WorldWide

Caring for someone with dementia is a full time responsibility and patients often need customised care as the different types of dementia have different symptoms. A specialist dementia care home can remove the stress of caring from you, allowing you to spend quality time with your loved one whilst being in the knowledge that they are receiving quality dementia care services.

We have homes located across the United Kingdom, so you’ll be sure to find a home in your area and suitable for your needs. Get in touch with a member of our friendly team today and we’ll answer any queries you may have and help you decide which Care WorldWide dementia care home will be best for yourself or a loved one.

Our Dementia Care Homes and Nursing Homes

Visit one of our award winning care homes…

  • Step 1
    Step 1

    Take a look through our homes to find the nearest home to you, or alternatively use the region or location search to narrow the search results to the homes near you.

  • Step 2
    Step 2

    Take a look at the gallery of images for the home you select, and read through the various information provided, including reviews and details of each home’s facilities.

  • Step 3
    Step 3

    Visit the home to see it for yourself, talk to staff and get a feel for the environment – no booking is necessary.

Recommended by our families…

I had an open mind with regards to my parents having to live in a care home due to their care needs and thankfully I am very impressed with the standard of care. The staff are very caring and welcoming, the food is lovely, activities are well planned and available, …

Our Associations:

  • Alzheimers Society
  • Care Quality Commission
  • NHS
  • Investors In People
  • Gold Standard Framework

Regular checks are in place to ensure the best care for your relative.

Top